wildlife

How to get into wildlife recording

#newyearnewme


We asked our local wildlife recorders what top tip they would give to someone starting their journey of wildlife recording for the New Year


1. Start off simple. Learn a few new species at a time and get to grips with them for a few weeks or months before moving on to others. You don’t want to overwhelm yourself with too much information to remember at the start. 

Mindfulness and Nature 

How often would you say you are mindful?  Do you know what being mindful involves, how to do it or what it actually means? 

Earthworms - Winter Wildlife

Earthworms are not actually a type of scientific classification but instead is the common name used to describe the largest members of Oligochaeta which are found in the phylum Analidia. Currently there are 29 species of earthworms in the UK that are considered native. And they are typically split into 3 ecological groups Epigeic, Endogeic and Anecic although some people also consider compost worms to be an extra ecological group. 

Epigeic 

Everyone can make a legacy! - Legacy Week

The Biodiversity Centre has a huge legacy of wildlife sightings dating back to the 1800s and is one of the biggest ways our supporters can make a difference in future conservation.

Every wildlife sighting that is shared with us is stored safely for the future and is used to monitor population trends and support protected areas.

Palmate Newt - Ecology

Species: The Palmate newt scientifically known as (Lissotriton helveticus) are the only species of newt found on the island of Jersey. Approximately 6cm in length with a similar appearance to the common newt. Although there are a few records on the JBC database of common newts these are most likely to be misidentified as Palmate newts. Both male, and sometimes female is characterised by smooth brown skin with lines of spots along the sides (flanks) and tail (McLaren, 2009).

Agile Frog - Ecology

Species: The Agile frog (Rana dalmatina) is unique in Jersey and is found nowhere else in the British Isles. It is no surprise that these frogs get their name as they are slim, with unique long stripey hind legs. Adults can grow up to 9cm, snout to vent length (SVL) and can jump up to a staggering 2 meters. This is particularly important when escaping from predation such as domestic cats which is a huge problem for almost every island native species. Whereas frogspawn is at risk by waterfowl (ducks) and non-native fish.

Jersey's unwelcome visitors

Jersey is home to a wide variety of native wildlife that each play and important role in maintaining the biodiversity of jersey. However, there are some non-native species who can cause damage to environments and outcompete some native wildlife for recourses which causes a huge disruption in the ecosystem. Unfortunately, Jersey contains some of these organisms that damage the environment, these organisms have been named an invasive species. 

How to get into wildlife recording

Wildlife recording can take place at any time of day or night and is a great way to appreciate nature around you. Nature is everywhere and taking notice can help with our mental wellbeing. We asked our local wildlife recorders what top tip they would give to someone starting their journey of wildlife recording for the New Year. 

Light and Noise Pollution

Almost everything we do has an impact on the world around us. When we think about pollution, we will often think about vehicle exhaust fumes or plastics contaminating beaches. You may not realise that noise and light can also be a form a pollution if they become harmful to wildlife.

 

Why are they harmful to wildlife?

Spring Species

Spring is the perfect time to start your wildlife recording journey. Whether you are watching wildlife from your window or out for a walk there is always plenty to see if we slow down. 

Wildflowers are showing up all along the lanes in Jersey. Whilst social distancing doesn't mean you can't get outside to enjoy the fresh air. There are plenty of walks to enjoy out in the countryside.